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Saturday, July 14

  1. page Question 5 edited ... Abstract: The media can be a powerful teacher of children and adolescents and have a profound …
    ...
    Abstract: The media can be a powerful teacher of children and adolescents and have a profound impact on their health. The media are not the leading cause of any major health problem in the United States, but they do contribute to a variety of pediatric and adolescent health problems. Given that children and teens spend >7 hours a day with media, one would think that adult society would recognize its impact on young people's attitudes and behaviors. Too little has been done to protect children and adolescents from harmful media effects and to maximize the powerfully prosocial aspects of modern media.
    Summary: A big part of this article is that adolescents spend their time listening or watch the media instead of sleeping, reading, studying, exercising, or so much more. This shows that their school work is effected, this concentration skills are effected, and finally multi- tasking is effected overall. Throughout this article it also mentions that adolescents spending anywhere up to seven hours have a chance of also receiving health problems that could cause serious damage in the future. {Pediatrics-2010-Strasburger-756-67.pdf}
    Does Media Use Have a Short-Term Impact on Cognitive Performance?: A Study of Television Viewing and Video Gaming
    Asja, M., Klara Maria, K., Friederike, M., & Arnold, L. (n.d). Does Media Use Have a Short-Term Impact on Cognitive Performance?: A Study of Television Viewing and Video Gaming. Journal Of Media Psychology, 2365-76. doi:10.1027/1864-1105/a000038
    Abstract: It has often been shown that the amount of media use is negatively related to cognitive outcomes. The more time spent on media the poorer cognitive performance is. This association has mainly been found for general-audience, violent, and action-loaded contents but not for educational contents. Typically, long-term-explanations like the time-displacement hypothesis are considered to account for this relation, although this cannot fully explain the association. Additionally short-term explanations should be considered, since it can be expected that media-induced stress can impair information processing. The present study compares short-term effects regarding memory performance and the ability to concentrate, using four different experimental conditions (high- vs. low-arousing films and video games). It was also examined if the experienced level of stress mediates group differences and if habitual media, habitual use of age-restricted contents or the trait sensation seeking moderate this mediation. Participants consisted of N = 117 university students. They were asked to learn written items before media use and to recall these after having used the media. Further, the ability to concentrate was measured. Experimental groups differed with regard to the cognitive outcome measures after media use. A significant univariate difference was found for high- vs. low-arousing contents in general (independent of type of media), the high-arousing content leading to poorer ability to concentrate after media use. The expected mediating and moderating effects are not supported. The study yields evidence that short-term mechanisms might play a role in explaining the negative correlations between media use and cognitive performance.
    Summary: This article used past research to show that the amount of media taken in by adolescents negatively affects cognitive outcomes, which made the researchers decide to take this question a step farther. What is media is used to teach instead of just show violence and other things? The groups measured produced different outcomes, which depended on how interesting the content was according to the adolescents involved. The final conclusion was that short- term methods may play a role in explaining the negative relationship between media and performance; which means that the media and performance still have a negative relationship even though educational media is involved.
    {jmp-23-2-65.pdf}

    OUTLINE FOR QUESTION 1-III. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES (Video clips, podcasts, lectures, etc.)III. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES (Video clips, podcasts, lectures, etc.)
    Media Multitaskers
    (view changes)
    2:10 pm
  2. file jmp-23-2-65.pdf uploaded
    2:04 pm
  3. page Question 5 edited ... Summary:This research article aimed to examine student multitasking through the use of laptops…
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    Summary:This research article aimed to examine student multitasking through the use of laptops during a lecture. The sample included 97 students from three different sections of a class taught at a university. Data was collected over the course of a 15 week semester. The researchers found that students who engaged more frequently in multitasking had decreased academic performance compared to those with a low frequency of multitasking. Similarly, students who engaged in this multitasking longer also had decreased academic performance. The researchers also found that students who engaged in higher rates of distractive versus productive tasks also had decreased academic performance.
    {Student Multitasking with Laptops.pdf}
    Children, Adolescents, and the Media:. Health Effects
    Victor C., S., Amy B., J., & Ed, D. (n.d). Children, Adolescents, and the Media:. Health Effects. The Pediatric Clinics Of North America, 59(Children, Adolescents, and the Media), 533-587. doi:10.1016/j.pcl.2012.03.025
    Abstract: The media can be a powerful teacher of children and adolescents and have a profound impact on their health. The media are not the leading cause of any major health problem in the United States, but they do contribute to a variety of pediatric and adolescent health problems. Given that children and teens spend >7 hours a day with media, one would think that adult society would recognize its impact on young people's attitudes and behaviors. Too little has been done to protect children and adolescents from harmful media effects and to maximize the powerfully prosocial aspects of modern media.
    Summary: A big part of this article is that adolescents spend their time listening or watch the media instead of sleeping, reading, studying, exercising, or so much more. This shows that their school work is effected, this concentration skills are effected, and finally multi- tasking is effected overall. Throughout this article it also mentions that adolescents spending anywhere up to seven hours have a chance of also receiving health problems that could cause serious damage in the future. {Pediatrics-2010-Strasburger-756-67.pdf}

    OUTLINE FOR QUESTION 1-III. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES (Video clips, podcasts, lectures, etc.)III. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES (Video clips, podcasts, lectures, etc.)
    Media Multitaskers
    (view changes)
    1:53 pm
  4. page Question 3 edited ... Summary: This article describes boys having an overall higher self esteem at the beginning, bu…
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    Summary: This article describes boys having an overall higher self esteem at the beginning, but mentioning that self- esteem actually relates to each child's own unique stress' in life. The stress' can includes peer pressure, home life, school performance, adult responsibility, and levels of emotional states. This shows that children should work on their self esteem because gender doesn't matter. Yes, you may have some children who have a high self esteem because they are not pressured, have a great home life, do great at school, and so much others, but I believe there is a lot more that can be done to help the majority of adolescents who do not have all these things.
    {Unni Karin PAID.pdf}
    The AssociationsAdolescent Perceptions of Self-ReportedParental Behaviors, Adolescent Self-Esteem, and Peer-Reported Relational Aggression with Narcissism and Self-Esteem among Adolescents in a Residential Setting
    Golmaryami, F. N.,
    Adolescent Depressed Mood.
    Plunkett, S., Henry, C., Robinson, L., Behnke, A.,
    & Barry, C. T. (2010). The AssociationsFalcon, P. (2007). Adolescent Perceptions of Self-ReportedParental Behaviors, Adolescent Self-Esteem, and Peer-Reported Relational Aggression with Narcissism and Self-Esteem among Adolescents in a Residential Setting.Adolescent Depressed Mood. Journal Of Clinical Child And Adolescent Psychology, 39(1), 128-133.& Family Studies, 16(6), 760-772. doi:10.1007/s10826-006-9123-0
    Abstract: The present study investigated the relationsUsing symbolic interaction, we developed a research model that proposed adolescent perceptions of self-reportedparental support and peer-nominated relational aggression (RA)psychological control would be related to adolescent depressed mood directly and indirectly through self-esteem. We tested the model using self-report questionnaire data from 161 adolescents living with both of their biological parents. To examine possible gender of adolescent differences, we tested two multigroup models separately for adolescents’ perceptions of mothers’ and fathers’ parental behaviors. Both the fathers’ and mothers’ models yielded (a) direct paths from self-esteem to depressed mood (for boys and narcissism among 43 at-risk 16-girls), psychological control to 18-year-olds. Self-reporteddepressed mood (for boys) and peer-nominated RA were positively intercorrelated, and each was positively correlated with narcissism. An interaction between(b) an indirect path from support to self-esteem and narcissism predicted peer-nominated RA, such that narcissism was related to peer-nominated RA particularly for individuals with high self-esteem. Maladaptive, but not adaptive, narcissism uniquely predicted peer-nominated RA. The implicationsdepressed mood (for girls and limitations of this study for research on adolescent self-perceptionboys) and RA are discussed. (Contains 2 tables, 1 figure,an indirect path from psychological control to self-esteem to depressed mood (for girls). In addition, in the fathers’ model a significant direct path was found between fathers’ support and 1 footnote.)depressed mood (for girls). [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    Summary: This study actually hasarticle analyzes adolescent self esteem through the opposite answeradolescents perception of the one that I posted above, in whichparental support and psychological control. As it says that many adolescents believe that their peers as being narcissistic. The ones that are described as narcissistic are also described as being the ones with high self esteem, which is what many counselors believe is true. Adolescents are spoiled from parents and family, which makes their time at school to turn into bullyingshown through the number of other children who have lowarticles, a number of factors relate to the self- esteem.esteem of adolescents. A program
    ...
    implemented to show both groups, since these studieshelp all the adolescents because we can never understand what is in each part of their life. Even though a few may have shownhigh self esteem that both groups are available,could be considered narcissism, there is probably a larger number that they are equal and should treat each other equally.
    {49152752.pdf}
    is defined as having low self esteem.
    {27557226.pdf}

    OUTLINE FOR QUESTION 1-III. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES (Video clips, podcasts, lectures, etc.)III. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES (Video clips, podcasts, lectures, etc.)
    1. Assessing Self-Esteem.
    (view changes)
    1:34 pm
  5. file 27557226.pdf uploaded
    1:33 pm
  6. page Question 4 edited ... Summary: This study provides evidence to support a model combining sex, family background, soc…
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    Summary: This study provides evidence to support a model combining sex, family background, social identity, and problem- solving style in predicting victimisation. As it continues, it mentions that the first step is awareness. A program needs to be implemented to help adolescents be aware of what bullying is, what needs to be done to stop bullying, and how those things will make an impact on the entire community.
    {36386142.pdf}
    School Violence: To What Extent do Perceptions of Problem Solving Skills Protect Adolescents?
    TÜRKÜM, A. (2011). School Violence: To What Extent do Perceptions of Problem Solving Skills Protect Adolescents?. Educational Sciences: Theory & Practice, 11(1), 127-132.
    Abstract: This study examined whether adolescents’ perceptions of problem solving skills differ according to their sex, ex- periences of exposure to violence, age and grade, and the variables predicting their experiences of exposure to violence. Data were collected from 600 (298 females, 302 males) 14-19 year-old students attending various types of high schools in central Eskişehir. The Problem Solving Inventory and a questionnaire were used in the study. Findings of the study revealed that students’ perceptions of problem solving skills do not change according to their sex and the place they are exposed to violence. Adolescents’ perceptions of problem solving skills differ in accordance with the level of their exposure to violence; perception level of the problem solving skills of the stu- dents rarely exposed to violence is higher than that of the students exposed to violence occasionally or often. Per- ception level of the adolescents who are often exposed to violence does not change depending on their sex and age. The variables predicting adolescents’ experiences of exposure to violence are listed as perceptions of prob- lem solving skills, sex, grade, age, and school type. In conclusion, the adolescents’ perceptions of problem sol- ving skills are partially effective in protecting them against school violence. The place of the skills training prog- rams -particularly the ones that aimed at prevention of and protection from violence- in the content of counse- ling programs was discussed.
    Summary: This study analyzes the question if problem solving skills that adolescents attain prevent school violence. The answer was no, which shows us that more needs to be done when implementing a bullying program. Professionals need to inspire adolescents and help them believe that by teaming up together and working as one, bullying can be stopped.
    {59777551.pdf}

    OUTLINE FOR QUESTION 1-III. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES (Video clips, podcasts, lectures, etc.)III. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES (Video clips, podcasts, lectures, etc.)
    Olweus Bullying Prevention
    (view changes)
    1:11 pm
  7. file 59777551.pdf uploaded
    1:11 pm
  8. page Question 4 edited ... Bullying may be an antecedent to more drastic incidents (e.g. Columbine shooting). This study …
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    Bullying may be an antecedent to more drastic incidents (e.g. Columbine shooting). This study sought to consider how the frequency of aggressive behaviors contribute to a student’s interpretation of the psychosocial environment of the school. The researchers also considered how school environments influence the existence of continuing aggressive and avoidance behaviors. The researchers found that victimization and bullying contribution were negative predictors of the school psychosocial environment. The environment is also a negative predictor of carrying a weapon for protection and avoidance behaviors. Thus it is important that we work to improve the school environment. Improvements in environment would allow for those to have better interpersonal experiences as well as greater academic achievement.
    {School Violence Bully Behaviors and the Psychosocial School Environment.pdf}
    Bullying and Victimisation in School Children: The Role of Social Identity, Problem-Solving Style, and Family and School Context
    Cassidy, T. (2009). Bullying and Victimisation in School Children: The Role of Social Identity, Problem-Solving Style, and Family and School Context. Social Psychology Of Education: An International Journal, 12(1), 63-76.
    Abstract: The relationship between social identity, family and school context, problem-solving style, self-esteem, health behaviour, psychological distress, and victimisation, was explored in a quasi-experimental survey of 461 children aged between 11 and 15 years old. There was a high prevalence of victimisation (29%) in the group and 44% of those victimised scored above the clinical cut-off on the GHQ. Victims exhibited higher levels of psychological distress, lower self-esteem, more unhealthy behaviours, less support from parents and teachers, poorer problem-solving styles, and lower perceived social identity. Girls had a higher prevalence of victimisation than boys. The best predictors of victimisation were sex, family situation, social identity and problem-solving style. Some implications for interventions are discussed.
    Summary: This study provides evidence to support a model combining sex, family background, social identity, and problem- solving style in predicting victimisation. As it continues, it mentions that the first step is awareness. A program needs to be implemented to help adolescents be aware of what bullying is, what needs to be done to stop bullying, and how those things will make an impact on the entire community.
    {36386142.pdf}

    OUTLINE FOR QUESTION 1-III. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES (Video clips, podcasts, lectures, etc.)III. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES (Video clips, podcasts, lectures, etc.)
    Olweus Bullying Prevention
    (view changes)
    1:04 pm
  9. file 36386142.pdf uploaded
    1:03 pm

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